CURIOSITY CREATES NEW TECHNOLOGY

Andreas Mogensen, the first Danish ESA astronaut, had a peek at the coming exhibition when he visited Aarhus University to celebrate the bicentennial of H.C. Ørsted's discovery of electromagnetism.

The exhibition 'Curiosity Creates New Technology' tells the story of H.C. Ørsted, electromagnetism and the electromagnetic spectrum. 

 

2020 marks the bicentennial of Ørsted’s discovery of the connection between electricity and magnetism, which is the theme of the new exhibition.

Everyday electromagnetism

The technology we use in our everyday life is built on knowledge and insights that we have not always been aware of. This knowledge has arisen from research. Over time, the researchers’ discoveries have paved the way for other people’s inventions.

We have known about electricity and magnetism for a long time, but it was not until the 19th century that we began to understand how the two phenomena are connected. This led to the discovery of electromagnetism.

Today, this knowledge is used in our everyday life. For instance, when we blow-dry our hair, listen to music or turn on the cooker.

The exhibition features some of the most recent research from Aarhus University including inputs from researcher Mogens Christensen from Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) where research into electromagnetism is still important. Just as the discovery of electromagnetism led to many new inventions and created a need for electricity and electric motors in our daily life, current research will provide the new technologies for our future, for instance, how to store green energy.   

The Light Tunnel

The exhibition also features a mirrored light tunnel, which has been built in collaboration with architectural firm Kollision and offers a walk through the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves to radiation. Each of the seven wavelengths contains an everyday object hidden in a box behind the mirrored foil, which lights up as guests pass by.